Category Archives: Malaysia

George Town to Kuala Lumpur 24 February – 7 March 2015

And so another chapter draws to a close. Peninsular Malaysia has been our home on and off for almost 8 of the last 18 months. We’ve sweated along busy highways; camped in palm oil plantations; eaten our fill of nasi lemak and char kuay teow; dived the crystal waters around Pulau Perhentian and Pulau Tioman; marvelled at Malaysia’s diverse cultural heritage (evidenced most memorably at Hari Raya, Thaipusam and Chinese New Year); and been welcomed into the hearts and homes of people from many different backgrounds.

However, during our time here there’s been one thing that we’ve never come to terms with: the heat. Until now it’s been sufficient to put us off attempting any significant climbs, but in George Town we decided to ‘man up’ and finish our time in Peninsular Malaysia on a literal high by making our way back to KL via the Cameron Highlands.

Rolling along with Jerry

Rolling along with Jerry

Things got off to an excellent start when we left Georgetown as we bumped into another cyclist heading our way. Jerry is from the UK and since retirement has been ‘cycling round the world in stages’, i.e. as and when he can get permission from his wife to head off for another few months. We invited him to join us for the night at our friends’ house in Simpang Ampat, and to our delight he agreed. He was easy-going company on the road and his tales of touring in India made it sound much less overwhelming than we’d previously assumed…perhaps we’ll add it to our ever-growing list.

After the usual entertaining time with the Myers family we spun back through Taiping (thanks Amanda) and on through Ipoh whereupon we got an early night in preparation for a pre-dawn start on the climb from Sungai Pulai up to Kampung Raja in the Highlands. We didn’t think it possible but if anything Malaysians are even friendlier at dawn than during the rest of the day: the number of people who wished us well as they rode past on their motorbikes was astonishing. As the sun climbed higher so did we; pedalling our stalwart and sweaty way onwards and upwards. After 10km or so a speedy roadie gave a cheery shout as he zipped easily by…jealous? Us? Well, yeah, just a bit. He was followed by a couple of guys on mtbs and then another roadie, who stayed with us for a chat. Ernest is Malaysian and lives in Ipoh but had been to school in Northern Ireland, near to where Keith went to school. Small world huh?

Our conversation was cut short when the gradient ramped up from 3 to 8%. Ernest twiddled away whilst we heaved and grunted and strained at the pedals. It wasn’t long before we waved him goodbye and fell back to suffer in private. Thankfully the steeper stretch didn’t last too long (in hindsight) and our reward when it levelled off a bit was the sight of Ernest waiting for us, along with the other roadie who’d gone up ahead (Quentin). They had stopped at a cafe where they bought us a coffee, and we were soon joined by Quentin’s wife Catherine. Apparently they do this climb most weekends. Chapeau!

Despite the good company we couldn’t relax for long – we’d only done 15 of the 50km climb and needed to get quite a bit higher before the sun got much hotter – so it was back to heaving on the pedals. With the steep section behind us we settled into an easy rhythm and began to actually enjoy the climb: not too much traffic, decent road surface, moderate gradient, a fair bit of shade and some beautiful views out over forest-clad hillside….and not a single oil palm in sight! By the time the sun hit its zenith we were sufficiently well advanced up the hill to enjoy, if not cool air, at least manageably hot instead of debilitating temperatures.

If you’re planning on doing this climb then take plenty of snacks and water. There are no towns between Sugai Pulai and Kampung Raja, and, after leaving Ernest & co at the cafe at around 15km, we saw nothing but the occasional listless Orang Asli (literally “original people”) women selling honey on the roadside, until several hours later when what looked like a temporary builders’ shelter hove into view. Drawing alongside we realised it was a cafe. The walls were a ramshackle patchwork of salvaged bits of corrugated iron and plywood, but the proprietor and other diners were friendly and, whilst the menu was limited (unless you wanted 3-in-1 coffee ,of which there were no fewer than nine different varieties!), the char kuay teow noodles tasted pretty damn fine….and there was even a pretty little fishpond out front!

Our snail’s pace and a midday snooze on a bamboo platform (a direct consequence of the pre-dawn start) meant it was now well into the afternoon. Re-fuelled, we saddled up and laboured on. As climbs go it was surprisingly enjoyable, but you know, it’s possible to have too much of a good thing, so when we topped out and began the descent into Kampung Raja we were starting to discuss our options for the night. After 1500m of steady climbing our legs were feeling pretty tired, but prior research (backed up by our questioning of locals when we got to Raja) suggested there were no hotels before Brinchang. It was cool enough to camp comfortably, but did we really want to get our nice dry tent damp again? But then again, did we really want to do another 500m of ascent (in the dark) to the known hotels in Brinchang, 15km away? Thankfully the dilemma resolved itself when we spotted a shabby sign pointing down an alleyway with the promise of a hotel – oh yeah! It was hard to find (just a small hand-printed note pinned on a shuttered-up archway marked its location) but after asking around a lady appeared and we got a good bed for the night. Sometimes it’s the smallest triumphs that make your day.

Despite our serendipitous hotel find, we have to admit that our first impression of the Cameron Highlands wasn’t particularly favourable. After the beautiful forest views on the climb we’d turned into the Highlands proper and immediately had been confronted by acre upon acre of plastic tunnels. Not pretty. The moderate temperatures (15-25 degrees) and well-drained, fertile soil mean that agriculture is the Cameron Highland’s main source of income. Tea plantations, strawberry farms, apiaries and temperate vegetable farms prevail; with each promoting its wares at tackily decorated (think giant concrete or fibreglass strawberries) visitor centres. It reminded us of the Isle of Wight…only somehow not as nice.

The not-so-lovely plastic-sheltered strawberry farms of the Cameron Highlands.

The not-so-lovely, plastic-sheltered strawberry farms of the Cameron Highlands.

After starting the morning with some more descending, the climb between Raja and Brinchang came as a lung-burstingly steep intrusion (and made us very glad we hadn’t attempted it on tired legs the night before), but it was only a relatively small part of the 20km jaunt along to Tanah Rata so entirely do-able. With time on our side we broke the day up with a stop at an apiary where we chatted for some time with David, a construction law specialist from the UK, who was squeezing in a bit of sightseeing into his KL lecture tour. The apiary had lots of hives, a lot of honey and bee-themed merchandise, but sadly not much information on beekeeping.

Beehives and, errmm, a bee.

Beehives and, errmm, a bee.

Disappointment levels notched up further when we finally got to Tanah Rata and discovered that the Mossy Forest (which we were very keen to see) was not actually near Tanah Rata as our Malaysian tourism app had suggested, but was back up a turn-off near the bee farm and then a further 10km up a very steep, badly surfaced road. Disgruntled we settled for a quick tramp along one of the local trails, and discovered that away from the intensive agriculture the forest is as diverse and beautiful as we could have wished for. Perhaps the Highlands were not going to be a let-down after all.

Determined to see the Mossy Forest we booked on a tour the next morning, and it was the best thing we could have done. We started off at a butterfly farm (which also had various interesting beetles, some arachnids and scorpions, snakes, lizards, frogs and even a few small, cute and furries), and then proceeded by Land Rover up the aforementioned steep and badly surfaced track to Gunung Brinchang, which, at 2000m, affords panoramic views of the Highlands (which turned out to be far less littered with plastic tunnels than the view from the road had belied).

A butterfly (no prize but much gratitude will be sent your way if you can tell us which species).

A butterfly (no prize but much gratitude will be sent your way if you can tell us which species).

And another one.

And another one.

And one rather less fortunate one.

And one rather less fortunate one.

The view from Gunung Brinchang...not a plastic sheet in sight.

The view from Gunung Brinchang…not a plastic sheet in sight.

A foolhardy fly perched on the brink of oblivion.

A foolhardy fly perched on the brink of oblivion.

Our excellent guide then took us into the ancient Mossy Forest and pointed out which plants can be used as insect repellents and which make good muscle rubs, and then left us to wander at our leisure past the end of the boardwalk and onto a preternaturally gnarly forest trail. More than 700 species of plants grow in the Cameron Highlands. Thick moss drapes every bough; orchids and vines compete for space with lichens, bromeliads and prehistoric fern trees; it’s a botanist’s wet dream. We passed a handful of other tourists on the boardwalk, but had the nature trail to ourselves and felt suitably adventurous scrambling around contorted roots and twisted branches in search of elusive pitcher plants.

Weird and wonderful shapes in the Mossy Forest.

Weird and wonderful shapes in the Mossy Forest (the trees not me!).

An orchid?

An orchid?

Action Man

Action Man

Returning along the boardwalk we found our guide chatting with another and joined their conversation for a while before heading down to the tea plantation. Unfortunately it was the one day of the week when the tea factory is closed, but we could still enjoy the views and also the company of our guide. His parents had been tea-pickers and he’d been born and raised in the highlands. Gazing across the plantation he told us wistfully “These hills are covered in my footprints; left from when I was a child.” It was an unexpected glimpse into someone else’s life and felt like a very personal and special gift.

Workers' houses on the Boh tea plantation.

Workers’ houses on the Boh tea plantation.

"These hills are covered in my footprints..."

“These hills are covered in my footprints…”

Arty spiral

Arty spiral

Instead of driving us back to Tanah Rata our guide dropped us in Brinchang and directed us to the start of another trail, so after lunch we set off along trails 2, 3 and 5. Once we established which was the correct path that the rather misleading sign was meant to be pointing at (the steps up the left hand side of the temple) the trail was easy to follow and well signed….and a really good work out. Just how we like to spend our ‘rest day’.

Enjoying the trails between Brinchang and Tanah Rata.

Enjoying the trails between Brinchang and Tanah Rata.

So, our final verdict on the Cameron Highlands? It’s well worth the climb.

The next day we dropped down past Ringlet to Sungai Koyan: beautiful scenery and very little traffic but a rolling road instead of the anticipated steady descent which made the 90+km much harder than we’d expected and made us wish we’d set off before midday, especially as the only hotel (which was in fact a homestay) in Sungai Koyan tried to charge us three times what we’d paid in George Town, causing us to take exception and camp in a palm oil plantation instead. Oh, and our gear cable broke that day on a completely shadeless stretch of hot tarmac, but at least it wasn’t too big a job to bung the spare one in.

The view on the descent from Ringlet.

A view from the descent from Ringlet.

It doesn't look very big but trust us, it was heavy.

This is where it landed.  It doesn’t look very big but trust us, it was heavy.

Sungai Koyan to Bentong was another hot day on rolling roads. The traffic was heavier too. At one point we were just about to remount the Pino after a rest stop when a lorry heavily laden with cut lengths of hardwood rumbled past…and shed a solid 2 foot chunk of 4 by 4 as it went. We didn’t see how close it actually came to us but it landed and rolled to a halt just ahead of the Pino and could have caused us considerable damage had it hit us. Mind you, we can’t do much to mitigate against mishaps like that so there’s little point dwelling on them.

Like the mad dogs we are we pushed on through the midday heat in an attempt to get to an air-conditioned hotel room as early as possible. We were beginning to flag, fantasizing about a cold drink, so pulled into what looked like a little cafe attached to a car wash, but the fridge full of cold drinks was a mirage: in reality a cabinet full of car shampoo. Unable to go any further we sat in a panting, sweaty heap under the car wash canopy until the guys took pity on us and brought over some iced tea.

We knew there was a 600m climb the next day over from Bentong to KL so made sure we had an early start. Skirting alongside the expressway our road was tranquil and verdant with very little traffic. The gradient was, for the most part, nice and easy, and it was another pleasant climb…until we approached the summit. That final kilometre is best not dwelt upon.

And then it was over.  An easy roll down the other side brought us back into KL, our journey’s end….or at least the end of our journey in Peninsular Malaysia.

We spent a night with our friends Angie and Yuen, celebrating the end of Chinese New Year with them, and then relocated across the city to Damansara Perdana where we are staying in the empty apartment of another friend (Annie).

Enjoying Yuen's fantastic cooking.

Enjoying Yuen’s fantastic cooking.

We fly to Indonesia early tomorrow morning so are now in the throes of dismantling the Pino, finishing this blog, catching up on a few repairs, and packing.

A discarded hi viz jacket found on the roadside being re-purposed into a new flag for our trailer.

A discarded hi-viz jacket found on the roadside being re-purposed into a new flag for our trailer.

As usual things never go quite to plan when we have a deadline, and the Samsung tablet we bought a few months ago has developed some battery problems so we had to detour through central KL yesterday and drop it off at the Samsung service centre. They’ve replaced the battery and motherboard and it seems to be working OK now, but it meant that yesterday evening was spent setting up all the apps again.

A combination of being disorganised and then finding extra chores to do (like fixing the tablet) has meant we haven’t done much research on Indonesia yet (we don’t even know where the airport is in relation to Jakarta for instance)…but I expect it’ll all work out, things usually do.

Meerkat II

Meerkat II

Oh, and one final little mention – we have a new travelling companion! In fact he’s been with us for a few weeks but hasn’t made it into the blog until now. You may recall we started our trip in April 2011 with Meerkat sitting proudly on the front of the Pino’s boom. He shared our adventures until April 2014 when he suddenly disappeared, missing in action in Thailand (chasing lady boys?). We tried to come to terms with our loss, but that little empty space at the front of the boom haunted us. So thanks to the marvels of the internet and a little space in my mum’s hand luggage when we met her in China back in January, Meerkat’s Cousin has joined the Threewheeling team.

Goodbye Cameron Highlands

Goodbye Cameron Highlands

Sungai Besar to George Town 4 February – 24 February 2015

The Hindu festival of Thaipusam (main topic of our last blog post) falls on a full moon once each year and is always 2 weeks before the Chinese New Year (CNY) which, being based on the lunar calendar coincides with the new moon. We were really lucky to see the Thaipusam festival the way we did at just a local temple in a non-tourist location, but for the CNY we decided we’d strategically position ourselves in the heart of the Chinese quarter of George Town, on Penang Island. Two years ago, we were in China for the New Year and failed to see anything much more than just loads of fireworks being randomly set off in the street by locals, so this CNY we were hoping to see a little more – perhaps a dragon dance, or perhaps a good firework display.

The leaning clock tower of Teluk Intan

The leaning clock tower of Teluk Intan

From Sungai Besar it took us 4 days to cycle up the coast to Penang province. En route we saw a leaning tower in Teluk Intan, we met another cycle tourist on the road (that hasn’t happened to us in ages), we saw the occasional fish-farm, and finally arrived at our friends’ house in Simpang Ampat – Brett, Noey & their 4 kids. The intention was to stay just a few days with them, but they’re just so hospitable and if they don’t rope you into something then their kids will. So trekking one day, lounging in the pool on a number of other days, massage on another, trip to local holiday island of Pangkor on another … you get the picture I’m sure – we were with them for 9 nights before we kicked ourselves out to get over to George Town before all the accommodation there filled up for the CNY holidays.

Trekking at Bukit Mertajam

Trekking at Bukit Mertajam

We arrived in George Town on Monday 16th February and with CNY national holidays being Thursday & Friday we had no trouble getting rooms in the same hotel that we stayed in when we were here last April (correct balance of nice & cheap). Of course we had the other small matter of needing to arrange our visas for Indonesia while in Georgetown, but you’ve probably already read about that, so I won’t mention that again. We also thought that with the few days before the actual New Year, we would be able to get around the town and establish which temples and clan-houses would help us best with our tick-list. How wrong we were. We began by going to a couple of the clan houses to ask about dragon dances and fireworks, and most just gave us blank faces and another just waved her hands and told us, “around the shops”.

Chinese Clan-house at the jetties area of town, decorated for New Year

Chinese Clan-house at the jetties area of town, decorated for New Year


One of the clan jetties, suitably decorated

One of the clan jetties, suitably decorated

The question is, do you consider the dance to be that of a dragon, or that of a lion? It seems that most people here call them lion dances, so while we were asking about dancing dragons, I think that may have been adding to the confusion. (A quick look on Wikipedia tells me that a Lion Dance is normally performed by 2 people who are covered by the lion costume while a Dragon Dance is performed by many people with the dragon’s body held aloft on poles)

A Dragon Boat, used in traditional races, with this particular one winning many races

A Dragon Boat, used in traditional races, with this particular one winning many races


Another decorated clan jetty after a shower of rain. Note the golden ram decoration – each golden figure represents a different animal of the Chinese lunar cycle.

Another decorated clan jetty after a shower of rain. Note the golden ram decoration – each golden figure represents a different animal of the Chinese lunar cycle.

We took ourselves to the local tourist office where they had a shiny brochure about what was going on over the holidays, but there was no mention of lions, dragons, or fireworks. The lady in the tourist office figured that our best chance of catching a lion dance would be at one of the local shopping malls, in the atrium area. We were a bit surprised to be told that when you come all the way to the heart of George Town’s Chinatown, to the UNESCO world heritage zone, filled with 19th & 20th century colonial and multi-cultural architecture, that the best place to see a traditional part of the New Year celebrations would be in a 21st century shopping mall.

The Goddess of Mercy Temple

The Goddess of Mercy Temple

Festive Lanterns outside a house

Festive Lanterns outside a house

New Year arrived at midnight on Wednesday and I went out for a walk around to catch whatever celebrations I might find. What I noted most was that nearly every temple shrine, or clan-house shrine, or even the shrines in front of people’s homes or businesses, had fireworks (or mostly firecrackers) set off just in front of them. Unlike fireworks of the western world which are colourful and artful, I think the main aim of Chinese fireworks is noise – a bit of light and sparkle is okay, but noise is a must. I believe the noise is to frighten off evil spirits and to bring good fortune. Earlier in the day at the Goddess of Mercy Temple, I had watched 3 guys lay out about 5 strips of firecrackers, overlapping and on top of each other and then set them alight at the central point and run for cover – the noise in the enclosed area of the temple was impressive and the proximity of people to the exploding crackers, was a bit crackers as well.

Firecrackers at the Goddess of Mercy Temple – don’t get too close!

Firecrackers at the Goddess of Mercy Temple – don’t get too close!


The biggest Joss Sticks you’ll ever see

The biggest Joss Sticks you’ll ever see

Lion dances proved difficult to find though. They seemed to be much more random than we might have appreciated. On Thursday morning (first day of the new year) as we sat in our hotel room reading after breakfast, one of the guys who works in the hotel came to our landing to tell guests that there was currently a lion dance going on out in the street, but by the time I got there, they were packing up and leaving. Later in the day, as we walked past a hotel, again we saw a dance troupe packing up and leaving to go to their next gig. On Friday morning, again while in our hotel reading and researching after breakfast, we heard drums from somewhere out on the street and the drums normally accompany the lions, so off I shot. I caught the tail of the 2-person lion disappearing into a nearby guesthouse, being followed through the door by the drummer with his drum being carried by two other members of the troupe.

Lion Dance going into a guesthouse – the ears can flap and the eyelids can wink closed!

Lion Dance going into a guesthouse – the ears can flap and the eyelids can wink closed!


Dance to the beat of the drum

Dance to the beat of the drum

At one point there were 3 lions in the street, going into various buildings. Each dance followed the same pattern – the drummer would begin a beat outside, perhaps together with cymbals and gongs, and the lion would then begin his dance, and if there was a shrine outside the building it would first dance in front of that.

Another drum team prepare to follow the lion into a building

Another drum team prepare to follow the lion into a building

But most Chinese owned buildings (homes, guesthouses, businesses, clan or society buildings) have a shrine inside and so the lion would coyly make its way to the shrine and do a particular dance before that. Year round, these shrines have some offerings sitting at them to feed the spirits, often pieces of fruit, but the lion was allowed to symbolically consume the offerings. The offerings for the lion were normally mandarin-oranges, sometimes a lettuce, and sometimes also a little red envelope – pretty similar to the red envelopes used for wedding gifts at a Chinese wedding – filled with money as a payment or reward for the troupe. The lion would cover the offering plate with his mouth and when he would lift away, the red envelope would be gone, the mandarins would be opened and part peeled but the lettuce would be in the lion’s mouth and would then get spat out. The lion would then back away from the shrine, but would never turn his back to it and so there was always a member of the troupe behind the lion guiding it out of the building and down the steps or over the gulley, back out to the street. Throughout the dance, the drummer changed the beat to match the particular part of the dance and once back out on the street, the dance would stop and the instant the drums stopped, the lion dancers removed the mask. Then the troupe would move to the next building and the owner of the building just left would set off strings of firecrackers.

The lion approaches the offering table, laid out in front of the shrine

The lion approaches the offering table, laid out in front of the shrine


The offerings get consumed

The offerings get consumed


The shrine being honoured by the lion

The shrine being honoured by the lion


A fine collection of (ceremonial?) spears in this clan-house

A fine collection of (ceremonial?) spears in this clan-house

At one point I wondered to myself who was organising the troupes and the timings of their arrivals into different parts of the town. Who organised things so that each building was only visited once … or perhaps if a building is visited many times, then their year will be filled with great fortune – what luck for them. Or perhaps it’s more like a, “our lion is here to dance for you to bring you good fortune … you wouldn’t want to miss out on that … now would you ?!?!?!”. Perhaps that’s just my Northern Ireland mentality coming through … “we’ll protect you if you pay us because you’re one of us, but we couldn’t possibly comment on what might happen to you if you didn’t have our protection”.

Lion approaches the offering, including the red envelope

Lion approaches the offering, including the red envelope


The reward for the lion’s hard work is in the red envelope

The reward for the lion’s hard work is in the red envelope


All gone!

All gone!

For the rest of Friday, we took ourselves off on a tour around the island on our bike. Our friend Annie in KL had recently done the circuit of Penang Island and recommended it to us, telling us that it was about 80kms. The northern coast of Penang is very developed but as you turn south along the western side of the island and climb up past a big reservoir, you leave the tourist hubbub behind and the road becomes narrow, peaceful and pleasant. For the south-west corner of the island, google-maps suggested there was a road closer to the coastline and less busy than the main road, so we decided to go that way. The P224 however became very narrow and soon headed uphill on little more than a pathway. We decided we were in no rush so we followed it. The pathway became singletrack and the nimble Pino with a steady headed stoker and a game-for-anything pilot just kept going. I could hear gasps on occasion from the front, and could often see Tamar’s shoulders lift and twist as we navigated the difficulties but sadly our fun was brought to a premature halt when a link on the chain broke. We did have a puncture repair kit with us, but we didn’t have a chain-splitting tool, so we were approximately stuffed and up what’s-it creek without a paddle. It took us at least 45 minutes to get out of the single track and back down to a real road, but we managed to freewheel the downhill sections. We soon reached a small village and got a cold drink, but sadly were told that the nearest bike-shop was about 10kms away … and it’s the CNY holidays so it may be closed. We ended up pushing and scootering the bike along for a full 30kms, past 3 closed bike shops, back to George Town. If our bike doesn’t attract enough attention when it’s working properly, it seemed to attract even more while Tamar was sitting on the front seat paddling her toes along the tarmac, and I was behind with one foot on one pedal and the other foot pushing on the ground to scoot us along … a whole lot quicker than walking though. For the next few days, my left leg was much more tired than my right.

The west side of Penang Island

The west side of Penang Island

Our other major task for our stay in George Town was to work out where we’re going next. One of the dive-instructors from Tioman Island, who is also a cycle-tourist – Astrid – had asked us if we would like to tour Malaysian Borneo with her and we were very taken by this idea. But we also want to complete our own Dive Instructor Training this year and to do so in Indonesia. Of course we could have worked all this out when we were in China over Christmas, or when we were in KL at the end of January, but we just kept putting it off. So we first established when the main holiday season is for Indonesia and then worked back from there to work out by when we should complete our instructor training. Then we realised that May and June aren’t that far away. In all, we spent ages reading about the myriad dive locations throughout Indonesia and then about the various dive schools at each and trying to put the jigsaw pieces of nice looking dive school, good dive locations close to shore and close to dive school, marine life that will offer us something new, and also somewhere where we can get cheap flights back to Singapore (as that’s where our diving kit is currently stored with a very kind friend). So with lots of homework done, emails sent, ferries investigated (and dismissed), flights booked and timetable set, we were ready to leave beautiful George Town and get on the road south, back to Kuala Lumpur for our flight to Java.

Happy Chinese New Year to you all and especially to all you goats, sheep, lambs and rams, as this is the year of the goat/sheep/lamb/ram.

Shopping Mall Lion Dance

Shopping Mall Lion Dance


This lion is acrobatic!

This lion is acrobatic!


Leaping from table to table - he'll be due a hansome reward in his red envelope

Leaping from table to table – he’ll be due a hansome reward in his red envelope


Not only can his ears and eyelids move, but he lights up!

Not only can his ears and eyelids move, but he lights up!

Beautiful street art in George Town - we took a photo of Tamar by the cat last year, but we hadn't spotted the rat just hiding around the corner ... I don't think the cat has either

Beautiful street art in George Town – we took a photo of Tamar by the cat last year, but we hadn’t spotted the rat just hiding around the corner … I don’t think the cat has either


Not quite dancing on the ceiling

Not quite dancing on the ceiling


If only all tanks were made to look like this one - outside an art gallery in George Town

If only all tanks were made to look like this one – outside an art gallery in George Town